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Ventral Hernia: Frequently Asked Questions

What is a ventral hernia?

ventral hernia usually occurs in the abdominal wall because of a weakening due to a previous surgical incision. The result is a bulge or tear in the abdominal wall that allows a balloon-like sac to form in the weakened area.

What happens during ventral hernia surgery?

Traditionally, surgeons have repaired a hernia through an open incision in the abdomen. Today, however, more and more people are having their ventral hernias repaired by MIP. During a conventional hernia repair, an incision, often several inches long, is made in the abdominal wall, through the skin, into the abdomen. The contents of the hernia are pushed back into the abdomen and the muscles are sutured back together. Most repairs include placing mesh to cover the weak area of the abdominal wall. ...

How can a ventral hernia be treated?

Some ventral hernias are treated with a truss, a special belt that keeps the hernia from bulging and pushing through the abdominal wall. Others are treated with a recommendation that the patient refrain from any strenuous activity. However, surgery is more common; herniorrhaphy procedures repair the abdominal wall after pressing the piece of organ back into its original position. As medical technology progresses, laparoscopic procedures are more common. ...

What is the difference between a ventral hernia and an incisional hernia ?

An incisional hernia simply refers to a hernia where a previous incision took place. Frequently, this is the ventral surface of the abdominal wall and so the terms mix. In either case, it is a defect through which a bulge takes place. This bulge could have intestine within and thus, needs repair.

What could happen if a ventral hernia is left untreated?

Like other hernias, a ventral hernia may become worse if left untreated. And ventral hernias can be dangerous, because abdominal structures, like the intestines, can become stuck or twisted in the hernia, leading to a more complex and riskier operation. While the only known treatment is to have the ventral hernia repaired through surgery, it is generally considered to be a low-risk surgical procedure associated with few complications. ...

How do I know if I have a ventral hernia?

You will need a doctor's diagnosis in order to confirm a suspected ventral hernia. Common symptoms of ventral hernia include discomfort or tenderness while lifting heavy objects, coughing or putting other stress on the body; bulges in the abdominal area, some of which may be pushed back into place or disappear when laying down; constipation; vomiting and nausea; or abdominal pain. If you suspect you have a ventral hernia, visit your doctor. ...
You will need a doctor's diagnosis in order to confirm a suspected ventral hernia. Common symptoms of ventral hernia include discomfort or tenderness while lifting heavy objects, coughing or putting other stress on the body; bulges in the abdominal area, some of which may be pushed back into place or disappear when laying down; constipation; vomiting and nausea; or abdominal pain. If you suspect you have a ventral hernia, visit your doctor. ...
You will need a doctor’s diagnosis in order to confirm a suspected ventral hernia. Common symptoms of ventral hernia include discomfort or tenderness while lifting heavy objects, coughing or putting other stress on the body; bulges in the abdominal area, some of which may be pushed back into place or disappear when laying down; constipation; vomiting and nausea; or abdominal pain. If you suspect you have a ventral hernia, visit your doctor. ...

What are the potential risks and complications of ventral hernia repair?

Some possible complications of this procedure include: Bleeding and bruising of the abdominal wall Recurrence of the hernia Seroma (fluid collection under skin, occasionally requiring aspiration) Temporary nerve injury causing abdominal pain, or numbness Rare complications include: Chronic abdominal wall pain Infection of the skin or mesh, requiring removal of the mesh Injury to intestine or surrounding structures, requiring re-operation Bowel obstruction Bleeding requiring a transfusion Adverse reaction to the antibiot... ...

What are the potential benefits of MIP over conventional surgery for ventral hernia repair?

MIP for ventral hernia repair has significant benefits over conventional surgery. These benefits include a shorter hospital stay and smaller incisions - so you can get back to your life sooner.

ventral hernia?

A ventral hernia is also known as an incisional hernia. Ventral hernias occur when a piece of an abdominal organ such as the intestine or bowel bursts through a weak area of a patient's abdominal wall where an old surgical scar is located.

A hernia occurs when an organ begins to protrude or push through the wall of muscle that surrounds it. What is a ventral hernia?

A ventral hernia is also known as an incisional hernia. Ventral hernias occur when a piece of an abdominal organ such as the intestine or bowel bursts through a weak area of a patient's abdominal wall where an old surgical scar is located.
Ventral hernias can also be known as incisional hernias. Ventral hernias occur when a piece of an abdominal organ such as the intestine or bowel bursts through a weak area of a patient’s abdominal wall where an old surgical scar is located.

Use of Mesh in Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repairs: How does a provider bill and get paid for this?

We can accept the mesh code, 49568 , billed in addition to the unlisted laparoscopic procedure code for laparoscopic ventral/hernia repair. Please note in the exceptional circumstance when another hernia repair is done in addition to a laparoscopic or open ventral hernia repair, for example 49505 -initial inguinal hernia repair, the mesh code will rebundle. In that scenario, you'd have to bill the unlisted lap procedure with a modifier 22 to receive reimbursement for the mesh. Date Posted: 1/31/2005
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